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Aftercare


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Aftercare


We believe that long-term alternative care for at-risk and abandoned children is best practiced within the family, not an institution.

Our model is supported by numerous studies indicating that family care, in lieu of institutional care, provides the best possible outcomes for children with respect to their psychological development and social and economic success. Our shelter homes accommodate children caught in vulnerable situations. Each child’s physical and psychological needs are met before being restored back with their families or placed in long-term family care.

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Approach


Approach


Approaching Childcare

Core Values

  • The children and families we serve are as precious as our own. Our programs represent our best effort at quality care that preserves dignity.
  • Family is the best mode of childcare. If biological parents are not available, foster parents offer the best solution. Institutional care is to be avoided as much as possible. Every child needs the loving bond of a parent and the long-term stability of a family.

Strategic Elements

  • Local organizations are the mode of community transformation. Equipping and resourcing local organizations offers the best approach because it brings empowerment through participation in a local community. This provides a social safety net, spiritual guidance, access to markets, capital, and information.
  • Collaboration with local organizations and networks provides a wealth of resources and volunteers already established in existing accountability structures.
  • Trained volunteers serve as caregivers and outreach workers. Volunteerism not only reduces administrative cost, but also ensures that caregivers are driven primarily by their love and compassion for the children rather than financial compensation.
  • We identify those who are most in need and help those children who are the most vulnerable and at risk. There is a waste of resources when programs become ‘numbers driven’ and little effort is given to distinguish the areas in which children are the most desperate.
  • Children are integrated into families, organizations, and communities that provide sustainable support. Issues of marriage, college, and career are handled as they are in any other family. They do not expire from that support system after they turn 18.
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Standards for Care


Standards for Care


Caring for Children

1. Background Checks

A home study and background check on each child is undertaken to ensure that no pre-existing family option is available.

2. Primary Caregivers

The relationships that children have with primary volunteer caregivers foster significant positive emotional and psychological results. Therefore, caregivers should work out of a sense of compassion and call rather than for financial benefit.

3. Stability

Caregivers commit to long-term service so that children do not have to suffer the trauma of continual re-bonding with parental figures. When a caregiving unit is established it is kept together until the children grow to adulthood without adding or removing siblings.

4. Unit Size

Each family unit should house no more than ten children and should have it's own sleeping, bathing, eating and socializing spaces as well as a separate, designated caregiver.

5. Quality Care

Each child should receive individual care and attention. Both the spirit as well as the daily routine of the home should reveal a fun, loving, nurturing environment where children receive structure, encouragement, praise, consistency and good role models from their caregivers and older siblings. Children should also receive adequate levels of nutrition, education and health care.

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Delhi, India


Project Highlight

Delhi, India


Project Highlight

Priya's Story

Hi, my name is Priya. I am from India and am ten years old. My mother died when I was a year old. My sister and I lived in a laborer’s camp with my father. He had a mental illness. His job was to smash rocks each day to build the road. He used to dig a pit and put me and my sister in it or even chain us so he wouldn’t lose us. We were rescued and put into a family. I have new sisters and a mother who loves me and cares for me. I even get to go to school now. I have been given a new life.

Description

Our alternative care plan is designed to be the best possible placement option for children who are not eligible for an adoption trajectory because of age, legal instability or experiencing significant traumas that require specialized care. The team approach provides the structure and professional therapies as well as the loving emotional bonds of a stable family that these children require. There are two possible models that roughly correspond to Foster parent/family care home and group home placements. The model introduces the God Parent and Mentor roles and reforms and recasts ‘group homes’ as Therapy Centers. It is theorized that these two innovations will greatly improve the experience for both children and caregivers.  

Foster Families  

are temporary placement options for children waiting for guardianship, adoption or reunification with biological family. 

Family Care Homes  

are small children’s homes that operate as alternative care options in countries where the legal or practical realities do not allow for fostering.  

God Parent & Family Mentors

make life-long commitments to the children as who provide emotional support, practical guidance and assistance to the children as extend family. They are certified to provide respite caregiving for biological and therapy center/foster caregiving staff on an ongoing basis. They provide emotional stability as they continue in their support role following the children from placement to placement. They are trained to offer guided mentoring for biological families and work with other caregivers to design and implement short-term care giving objectives in line with the child’s long-term ‘plan of care’.    

Therapy Centers  

represent the last hope for children who are unable or unwilling to benefit from a foster caregiver because of trauma and delinquent behavior. These centers are categorized as ‘group homes’ in most legal/compensation systems. However, they are distinguished as ‘complete care centers’ that provide alternative education, spiritual and clinical therapies, as well as sport/nature/art experiences. Caregiving staff work with GPFM’s to gain trust and project a positive alternate vision of the child’s future that is made compelling to the child through emotional intimacy.